Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”    — Steve Jobs

Designer Charis Tsevis has built a graphic monument to Jobs that hammers home his giga-influence on computers and product design: a ten-thousand-pixel wide photo collage that forms Steve’s face out of the products he has created.

via GOOD and Co.Design

And that ever-present black turtleneck. RIP Steve Jobs, we’ll miss you and your vision.

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Richard Feynman on beauty. I’ll let the video speak for itself.

The Feynman Series is a companion project with The Sagan Series, a collection of videos that pays tribute to the man that brought astrophysics (and science in general) to the masses – Carl Sagan. (And if you’re not familiar with the series, you owe it to yourself to check it out immediately, starting with this).

Kia has tapped into the nail art trend in order to create the world’s first stop-motion ad on fingernails. The ad promotes Kia’s “smALL” sized Picanto, proving that one really can pack big things into compact spaces. It took only 25 days to create this masterpiece, using 1,200 bottles of nail polish for a total of 900 fingernails.




Series by Kirby Ferguson

We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for. To quote from Whitman, “O me! O life!… of the questions of these recurring; of the endless trains of the faithless… of cities filled with the foolish; what good amid these, O me, O life?” Answer: that you are here; that life exists, and identity; that the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse; that the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse. What will your verse be?”

This triptych was created by Lauren Scanlon, a very good friend of mine. The piece includes portraits of Joni Mitchell, Jim Morrison and Bob Dylan, all of whom were invited to play at Woodstock and regrettably declined due to other obligations. Each piece includes a hint of why they were absent or declined.

Joni Mitchell’s manager booked her for the Dick Cavett show and encouraged her to go on the show rather than perform at the music festival.

Many speculated that Jim Morrison declined because he didn’t like to perform outdoors. He thought that Woodstock was going to be a second class repeat of Monterey Pop Festival.

Bob Dylan had signed up to play at the Isle of Wight Festival of Music earlier on, and he set sail on the Queen Elizabeth II with his wife Sarah on August 15th, the day Woodstock began.

Scanlon’s artwork never fails to impress me. She particularly succeeds in creating unique portrait paintings. Be on the lookout for more great things from her.

 

Kinetic typography is the technical name for “moving text” and it is an animation technique mixing motion and text to express ideas using video animation. The text is presented over time in a manner intended to convey or evoke a particular idea or emotion. You’ve probably seen examples of this technique in movie title sequences and credits. The video above features the voice of Terence McKenna, an American writer who had strong opinions on psychedelic drugs and their role in society. He advocated the exploration of altered states of mind and often explored the theme of existence beyond the physical body.

This next video is hilarious. Kinetic typography for a scene from Wedding Crashers.

 

The video below is a beautiful example of typography. I included it just because I love it so much. It comes from the opening title sequence of Thank You For Smoking.

 

Artist Olafur Eliasson’s exhibitions are all about you. Not only do they provide a heightened sense of self, but they also literally would not be complete without you. Eliasson’s work is all about interaction. His installations call you to participate. Former senior curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Madeleine Grynsztejn calls Eliasson “an artist who wants to expose how wonder is made”.

 

I saw Eliasson’s “Take Your Time” installation at the Dallas Museum of Art close to two years ago. It is easily the most unique collection of art I have ever seen.

The first piece of work encountered is an electric fan hanging on a cord from the ceiling, using its own moving blades to propel it across the room. The cord swings just above head level – low enough to alarm you.

The fan’s ever-changing, unpredictable arcs provide a striking metaphor for perception in motion. Eliasson engages in an ongoing exploration of subjectivity, reflection, and the fluid boundary between nature and culture, revealing the degree to which reality is constructed and helping us to reflect more critically on our experience of it.” ~Roxana Marcoci and Klaus Biesenbach

Eliasson enables you to experience art with all of your senses, just as you would in nature. His work creates a social sphere. You are not just standing in front of a work of art. You are inside the work. You are actively engaged. Looking becomes an experience.

In “Room for one colour,” monofrequency lights eliminate every wavelength except yellow. Everyone in the room appears colorless. The white walls of the room next to you appear blue, due to an involuntary neurological response.

My favorite of Eliasson’s installations is called “Beauty”. It is an installation that can be easily missed if you do not take your time and explore the collection. One room in the collection has about 5 black squares on its walls. I approached one of the squares and noticed a muggy smell. I reached out my hand and discovered that this was not just another square on the wall — it was a dark, hidden tunnel leading into another room. As I followed the tunnel into the room, the smell became more pungent and I began to see a soft light. “Beauty” features a spotlight shining on a curtain of fine mist in an otherwise darkened room, producing a gossamer rainbow visible from certain angles. The rainbow looks different to all who see it. The hose creating the mist is plain to see.

Eliasson separates himself from other artists doing similar installations because he exposes the mechanisms by which the effects are produced. This does not make the work any less magnificent. You become more conscious of more aspects of yourself and you become aware of how it is that you are seeing. Olafur Eliasson reminds us to participate in our world. Or not. I think Eliasson just wants us to be a little more aware of ourselves.

Iris van Herpen is a Dutch fashion designer who just showed her Escapism couture collection in Paris. Escapism is her second 3D printed fashion collection after last season’s Crystallization. The collection is a collaboration between Iris van Herpen and architect Daniel Wildrig with the label .MGX by Materialise. The pieces are made with selective laser sintering in Polyamide. Pretty sweet, if I do say so myself.

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