Archives for category: Painting

ImageHeart of the Andes, Frederic Edwin Church 

“The most beautiful and deepest experience a man can have is the sense of the mysterious. It is the underlying principle of religion as well as all serious endeavor in art and science. He who never had this experience seems to me, if not dead, then at least blind. . . . To sense that behind anything that can be experienced there is something that our mind cannot grasp and whose beauty and sublimity reaches us only indirectly and as a feeble reflection, this is religiousness. In this sense I am religious. To me it suffices to wonder at these secrets and to attempt humbly to grasp with my mind a mere image of the lofty structure of all that is there.” — Albert Einstein

ImageThe Oxbow, Thomas Cole

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This triptych was created by Lauren Scanlon, a very good friend of mine. The piece includes portraits of Joni Mitchell, Jim Morrison and Bob Dylan, all of whom were invited to play at Woodstock and regrettably declined due to other obligations. Each piece includes a hint of why they were absent or declined.

Joni Mitchell’s manager booked her for the Dick Cavett show and encouraged her to go on the show rather than perform at the music festival.

Many speculated that Jim Morrison declined because he didn’t like to perform outdoors. He thought that Woodstock was going to be a second class repeat of Monterey Pop Festival.

Bob Dylan had signed up to play at the Isle of Wight Festival of Music earlier on, and he set sail on the Queen Elizabeth II with his wife Sarah on August 15th, the day Woodstock began.

Scanlon’s artwork never fails to impress me. She particularly succeeds in creating unique portrait paintings. Be on the lookout for more great things from her.

Visit artist Charmagne Coe’s website here.

Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, by Caspar David Friedrich (1818)

Caspar David Friedrich was a 19th-century German Romantic landscape painter, generally considered the most important German artist of his generation. The visualization and portrayal of landscape in an entirely new manner was Friedrich’s key innovation. He sought not just to explore the blissful enjoyment of a beautiful view, but rather to examine an instant of sublimity, a reunion with the spiritual self through the contemplation of nature. Friedrich created the notion of a landscape full of romantic feeling—die romantische Stimmungslandschaft.

See Rafael Pavon’s “Mind the Fog” animation below for a more modern approach to this concept:

 

Pavon plays with the feelings experienced by the wanderer in Friedrich’s Wanderer above the Sea of Fog, transposing them onto a modern day London. Pavon’s animation combines a heady mix of layers of photography and 3D affects to achieve a landscape filled with whirling clouds and moving red buses.

The Clocktower at St. Tropez, by Paul Signac (1896)

Image courtesy of Bridgeman Art Library

 

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